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Energy and power or drinking water: Choices to be made by 2040 - DigitalJournal.com

Water Energy News from Google - 3 hours 36 min ago

DigitalJournal.com

Energy and power or drinking water: Choices to be made by 2040
DigitalJournal.com
Studies are warning us of a severe water shortage by the year 2040 if the world's energy and power situation is not reined in. Two new reports on the electricity and water problem have just been published. The studies took three years and focus on the ...
Worldwide Water Shortage by 2040: Scientists Urge Energy AlternativesScience World Report
Investment in wind and solar energy needed to avoid water crisis, study warnsBlue & Green Tomorrow
World faces 'insurmountable' water crisis by 2040 – reportRT
Catholic Online -International Business Times -Al Jazeera America
all 45 news articles »
Categories: U.S. EPA News

Century-old pipe break points to national problem - Albany Times Union

Google: Science Water - 3 hours 40 min ago

Century-old pipe break points to national problem
Albany Times Union
There was disagreement on the cause but one independent investigation found the culprit was a city law that rationed lawn watering for conservation. With residents restricted to watering only two days a week, pressure fluctuated in the city's water ...

and more »

Groundwater Depletion in Colorado River Basin Poses Big Risk to Water Security - National Geographic

Google: Science Water - 5 hours 42 min ago

Groundwater Depletion in Colorado River Basin Poses Big Risk to Water Security
National Geographic
For anyone concerned about the future of the American West, the findings of this study – which was published online in the journal Geophysical Research Letters and conducted by a team of scientists from NASA, the University of California-Irvine, and ...

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Settlement of Clean Water Act Violations Aims to Prevent Future Oil Spills by Archer Daniels Midland Company

U.S. EPA Water News - 5 hours 57 min ago
Environmental News FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Lenexa, Kan., July 30, 2014) - Archer Daniels Midland Company, a food processing and commodities trading company headquartered in Decatur, Ill., has agreed to settle allegations that it violated the Clean Water Act (CWA) at five different large oil storage facilities located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Columbus, Neb.; Des Moines, Iowa; Mexico, Mo.; and Deerfield, Mo

Earthquake Plot Thickens in Pacific Northwest

U.S. Geological Survey News - 6 hours 17 min ago
Summary: Nearly forgotten research from decades ago complicates the task of quantifying earthquake hazards in the Pacific Northwest, according to a new report from scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Washington, and other universities

Contact Information:

Leslie  Gordon, USGS ( Phone: 650-329-4006 ); Hannah Hickey, UW ( Phone: 206-543-2580 );



SEATTLE, Wash. — Nearly forgotten research from decades ago complicates the task of quantifying earthquake hazards in the Pacific Northwest, according to a new report from scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Washington, and other universities.

The report focuses on the Cascadia subduction zone—a giant active fault that slants eastward beneath the Pacific coast of southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California. Geologic studies in the past three decades have provided increasingly specific estimates of Cascadia earthquake sizes and repeat times. The estimates affect public safety through seismic provisions in building design and tsunami limits on evacuation maps.

The new report does not question whether the Cascadia subduction zone repeatedly produces enormous earthquakes. What the report asks instead is how much geologists can say, with confidence, about the history of those earthquake going back thousands of years. How big was each of the earthquakes? Did they occur twice as often along one part of the subduction zone as another? The report concludes that extracting such details from deep-sea sediments is more complicated than was previously thought.

The report reappraises sediment cores that were collected near the foot of the continental slope offshore Washington. A subset of cores from this area underpins influential estimates of Cascadia earthquake size and recurrence that were published in 2012. The new report points to confounding evidence from a much larger suite of cores that were collected and first analyzed by University of Washington and Oregon State University scientists in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Those Nixon-era cores were the work of researchers unconcerned with earthquakes. Plate tectonics was then such a new idea that scientists were just beginning to recognize the Cascadia subduction zone as a tectonic plate boundary. The sediment cores were collected to learn about turbidites—beds of sand and mud laid down by bottom-hugging, sediment-driven currents that infrequently emerged from submarine canyons onto the deep ocean floor. Not until a 1990 report would turbidites be reinterpreted as clues to Cascadia earthquake history.

“Rethinking turbidite paleoseismology along the Cascadia subduction zone” is freely available online in Geology, a leading Earth-science journal. The authors are Brian Atwater (U.S. Geological Survey), Bobb Carson (Lehigh University), Gary Griggs (University of California Santa Cruz), and Paul Johnson and Marie Salmi (University of Washington).

Payday for Hydropower, If Senate Can Pass Energy-Water Bill - Roll Call (blog)

Water Energy News from Google - 6 hours 27 min ago

Payday for Hydropower, If Senate Can Pass Energy-Water Bill
Roll Call (blog)
Rather than rebalancing the programs, Senate Energy-Water appropriators recommended maintaining the current funding for hydrokinetic at $41.3 million while boosting the type of funding for HydroNEXT to $27.5 million, close to a 60 percent increase.

Categories: U.S. EPA News

Two Kansas City Groups to Receive $119,940 from EPA’s Urban Waters Small Grants Program for Focus on Middle Blue River

U.S. EPA Water News - 6 hours 38 min ago
Environmental News FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Lenexa, Kan., July 30, 2014) - Two non-profit organizations in Kansas City, Mo., have been selected to receive a total of $119,940 in funding from EPA’s Urban Waters Small Grants Program for projects focused on improving areas around the Middle Blue River through Jackson County, Mo., and part of Johnson County, Kan

Nesting Gulf Sea Turtles Feed in Waters Filled With Threats

U.S. Geological Survey News - 6 hours 47 min ago
Summary: Nesting loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico feed among areas that were oiled by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and where human activities occur, several of which are known to pose threats to sea turtles, a new U.S Geological study showed

Contact Information:

Kristen Hart ( Phone: 954-650-0336 ); Christian Quintero ( Phone: 813-498-5019 );



DAVIE, Fla.— Nesting loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico feed among areas that were oiled by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and where human activities occur, several of which are known to pose threats to sea turtles, a new U.S Geological study showed.

The feeding areas for 10 turtles overlapped with an area that experienced surface oiling during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. These sites, and others, also overlapped with areas trawled by commercial fishing operations and used for oil and gas extraction.

The study, which is the largest to date on Northern Gulf loggerheads, examined 59 nesting females, which scientists believe could be 15 percent of the breeding females in the Northern Gulf of Mexico—a small and declining subpopulation of loggerheads that is federally classified as threatened.

“With such a large sample of the nesting females, we’re finally getting the big picture of when, where and how females that nest in the northern Gulf of Mexico rely on off-shore waters to survive. This information is critical for halting and reversing their declines,” said USGS research ecologist Kristen Hart, the lead author of the study.

The study began in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill as a means to better understand how sea turtles used habitat in the Northern Gulf of Mexico by analyzing the movements of turtles tagged between 2010 and 2013.

All of the turtles tracked in the study remained in the Gulf of Mexico to feed, and a third remained in the northern part of the Gulf. This differs from reports in other parts of the world, where some loggerheads have been shown to migrate across ocean basins after nesting.

“These results show how important the Gulf of Mexico is to this group of loggerheads – they stay here throughout the year, not just during the nesting season,” said USGS research biologist Meg Lamont, a co-author on the study.

The study also revealed specific parts of the Gulf where females feed and spend most of their time.  It is believed that an individual turtle will return to these specific feeding areas throughout her life, a trait scientists call “foraging site fidelity.”

“With this study, we essentially discovered their homes – the waters where these loggerheads spend most of the year,” Lamont said. “People think of nesting beaches as their homes, but they don’t really spend much time there. They only migrate to the nesting beaches to lay eggs. The rest of their adult life is spent foraging at sea.”

The next step for USGS scientists Hart and Lamont is to track these nesting Gulf loggerheads long enough to test whether they do indeed re-visit the same feeding areas throughout their life, as they suspect. This would help pinpoint important feeding sites of long-term and high traffic use – in essence, their home ranges.

“Locating long-term feeding areas will really open up new possibilities for the conservation and management of these amazing creatures,” said Hart.

The study, “Migration, foraging, and residency patterns for Northern Gulf of Mexico loggerheads: Implications of local threats and international movements” was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE. 

Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on ... - Science Codex

Google: Science Water - 7 hours 45 min ago

Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on ...
Science Codex
Scientists studying the potential effects of climate change on the world's animal and plant species are focusing on the wrong factors, according to a new paper by a research team from the Wildlife Conservation Society, University of Queensland, and ...

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Recycled water may flood urban parks with dangerous germs - Science News

Google: Science Water - 9 hours 55 min ago

Science News

Recycled water may flood urban parks with dangerous germs
Science News
In a survey of parks in seven Chinese cities, researchers found that parks irrigated with treated wastewater were awash in signs of drug-resistant germs. Even after the recycled water is treated in a sewage plant, it may carry ... Ecologist Yong-Guan ...

Recycled water may flood urban parks with dangerous germs - Science News

Google: Science Water - 9 hours 55 min ago

Science News

Recycled water may flood urban parks with dangerous germs
Science News
In a survey of parks in seven Chinese cities, researchers found that parks irrigated with treated wastewater were awash in signs of drug-resistant germs. Even after the recycled water is treated in a sewage plant, it may carry ... Ecologist Yong-Guan ...

Discovery Science Center's LA offshoot museum to open in November - Los Angeles Times

Google: Science Water - 9 hours 59 min ago

Discovery Science Center's LA offshoot museum to open in November
Los Angeles Times
Turning a lingering and expensive civic embarrassment into a new asset for science education, a never-used, $21.8-million building paid for by the city to give the San Fernando Valley its first major museum finally will open Nov. 13 at Hansen Dam ...

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Discovery Science Center's LA offshoot museum to open in November - Los Angeles Times

Google: Science Water - 9 hours 59 min ago

Discovery Science Center's LA offshoot museum to open in November
Los Angeles Times
Turning a lingering and expensive civic embarrassment into a new asset for science education, a never-used, $21.8-million building paid for by the city to give the San Fernando Valley its first major museum finally will open Nov. 13 at Hansen Dam ...

and more »

Accessing Water, Energy a Growing Risk for Mining Industry: Report - OOSKA News

Water Energy News from Google - 10 hours 41 min ago

Accessing Water, Energy a Growing Risk for Mining Industry: Report
OOSKA News
Access to water and energy is a growing risk for the mining industry, according to global professional services firm Ernst & Young. The company included water and energy for the first time in its top 10 mining risk list for 2014, released this week.

Categories: U.S. EPA News

Accessing Water, Energy a Growing Risk for Mining Industry: Report - OOSKA News

Water Energy News from Google - 10 hours 41 min ago

Accessing Water, Energy a Growing Risk for Mining Industry: Report
OOSKA News
Access to water and energy is a growing risk for the mining industry, according to global professional services firm Ernst & Young. The company included water and energy for the first time in its top 10 mining risk list for 2014, released this week.

Categories: U.S. EPA News

Pop-Up Books Make Environmental Science Easy-Peasy For Kids - 88.9 KETR

Google: Science Water - 12 hours 11 min ago

Pop-Up Books Make Environmental Science Easy-Peasy For Kids
88.9 KETR
For the average school kid, weighty, wonky topics like conservation, climate change and the circular economy might sound off-putting, if not downright dull. ... Her books, written for 7- to 12-year-olds, tackle a variety of environmental and earth ...

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Take a Trip to the Islands

U.S. Geological Survey News - 12 hours 17 min ago
Summary: Since August 2013, all 50 states have been available for editing with the USGS The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) volunteered geographic information project. Starting this month, TNMCorps is pleased to add the United States Virgin Islands to that list The U.S. Virgin Islands are now available for structure updates with The National Map Corps crowd-sourcing volunteers

Contact Information:

Mark Newell, APR ( Phone: 573-308-3850 ); Erin Korris ( Phone: 303-202-4503 ); Elizabeth McCartney ( Phone: 573-308-3696 );



Since August 2013, all 50 states have been available for editing with the USGS The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) volunteered geographic information project. Starting this month, TNMCorps is pleased to add the United States Virgin Islands to that list.

Using crowd-sourcing techniques, TNMCorps encourages citizen volunteers to collect data about manmade structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative spatial map data for the USGS National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map

Through an online map editor, volunteers use aerial images and other resources to improve structures data by adding new features, removing obsolete points, and correcting existing data. Points available to edit include schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations and other important public buildings. Volunteers may find editing structures in the U.S. Virgin Islands quite challenging, as some source data points shown in the map editor may be out of date, and some structure types are missing entirely.

One of many younger volunteers has found that contributing to The National Map Corps has been a rewarding summer activity.  “I’ve only been working for a month and already I’ve discovered interesting facts, like where Sacagawea is buried, and all of the unique names for places around the country,” said user “crazeyme,” who is also one of the top producing participants. 

To recognize our volunteers, TNMCorps has instituted a recognition program that awards "virtual" badges" based on the number of points edited.  Badges consist of a series of antique surveying instruments ranging from the Surveyor's Chain (25 – 50 points) to the Theodolite Assemblage (2000+ points). Additionally, volunteers are publically recognized (with user permission) via Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.

Volunteers only need access to a computer and the Internet to participate.  The National Map Corps’ website explains how volunteers can edit any area, regardless of their familiarity with the selected structures. Registration is simple and requires only an email address and self-selected username. 

Participants make a significant addition to the USGS's ability to provide accurate information to the public. Data collected by volunteers become part of The National Map structures dataset which is available to users free of charge.

See for yourself how much fun participating can be. Go to The National Map Corps and give it a try.

Screen shot of The National Map Corps editor webpage showing the capitol city of Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas, St. Thomas. Within this image lies the governmental center, public schools, and more– which is why The National Map Corps needs your help! (high resolution image 3.3 MB) Badges awarded for submitting edits, shown in from first to last: Order of the Surveyor’s Chain (25-49), Society of the Steel Tape 50-99), Pedometer Posse (100-199), Surveyor’s Compass (200-499), Stadia Board Society (500-999), Alidade Alliance (1000-1999), and Theodolite Assemblage (2000+). New awards for volunteers exceeding 2,000 points are under review. (high resolution image 114.7KB)

Iowa farmers snap up conservation funding - kwwl.com

Google: Science Water - July 29, 2014 - 14:58

Iowa farmers snap up conservation funding
kwwl.com
"The tremendous response to this cost-sharing shows once again that farmers are committed to using voluntary, science-based conservation practices to continue to improve water quality," said Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey. "In less than one ...
Tremendous response to Iowa's new nutrient reduction programPork Magazine

all 7 news articles »

UC Research Studies How to Improve Water Distribution in Developing Nations - University of Cincinnati

Google: Science Water - July 29, 2014 - 13:48

UC Research Studies How to Improve Water Distribution in Developing Nations
University of Cincinnati
Shrestha's novel work on satellite water tanks, titled “Feasibility of Using Satellite Water Tanks for Protecting Drinking Water in Urban Communities in Developing Countries,” was featured as a chapter in the text "Securing Water and Wastewater Systems ...

UC Research Studies How to Improve Water Distribution in Developing Nations - University of Cincinnati

Google: Science Water - July 29, 2014 - 13:48

UC Research Studies How to Improve Water Distribution in Developing Nations
University of Cincinnati
Shrestha's novel work on satellite water tanks, titled “Feasibility of Using Satellite Water Tanks for Protecting Drinking Water in Urban Communities in Developing Countries,” was featured as a chapter in the text "Securing Water and Wastewater Systems ...

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